Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Why I Write Poetry: Annie Newcomer

In 2017, I started a “Why I Write Poetry” series of guest posts. I’ve already received so many, and I hope they keep coming in (details on how to contribute below). Today’s “Why I Write Poetry” post comes from Annie Newcomer, who I met once at the Austin International Poetry Festival and who writes, “The unexpected pleasure of writing for me has been the way a poem can resolve certain aspects of my past as well as help me to be curious for the future.”

Annie Newcomer lives in Prairie Village, Kansas with her husband, David. Her two adult daughters inspire her to tackle new adventures such as triathlons and 10 km runs. She loves to travel. Annie appreciated opportunities to see the world and to meet poets from different cultures. She loves her involvement with Compassion International where she has sponsored children from India, Peru and the Dominican Republic and coaching chess in after-school daycare programs in Kansas City.

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Master Poetic Forms!

Learn how to write sestina, shadorma, haiku, monotetra, golden shovel, and more with The Writer’s Digest Guide to Poetic Forms, by Robert Lee Brewer.

This e-book covers more than 40 poetic forms and shares examples to illustrate how each form works. Discover a new universe of poetic possibilities and apply it to your poetry today!

Click to continue.

*****

Why I Write Poetry: Annie Newcomer

Annie Newcomer

When I was seventeen my brilliant father who I had always seen as omnipotent had an accident. Life changed for my large family in ways none of us had ever anticipated. I guess that we didn’t consider that kryptonite actually existed. So at a rather young age, Life became for me a series of lessons in survival. Writing or reading poetry was unfortunately the last thing on my list. Working a string of jobs and dealing with the mundane reality of day-to-day needs occupied the full of me.

Ten years ago, I lost another incredible member of my family too soon. He was a professor at University College London, beloved by his students and his academic community. He, not I, understood and loved poetry. Since I never imagined that I would have the literary chops to pen a book, and as I remembered a very short poem by Emily Dickinson, “Because I Could Not Stop For Death,” I determined that I would write a poem in my brother’s honor. After all, how difficult could it be to write a simple “short” poem?

Anyone could do that, I reasoned. A hard fact I encountered was this: anyone can, indeed, write a poem but not everyone can write a “good” poem.

So now, just as I had decades ago tried to survive in a young person’s world, I find myself, searching for ways to learn the craft of poetry and a longing to feel competent in the writers’ world. Since I live in Kansas, I liken my experience to the famous children’s story, The Wizard of Oz. I have met some wonderful poets on my yellow brick road. However, I have also bumped into the Wicked Witch of the West a time or two.

The unexpected pleasure of writing for me has been the way a poem can resolve certain aspects of my past as well as help me to be curious for the future. At the school Cristo Rey, the motto the students say each day before they began classes is “Look forward to the good that is yet to be.” I think this is how I like to see poetry, a melding of my hands and mind creating words that help me to become my best self.

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If you’d like to share why you write poetry, please send an e-mail to robert.brewer@fwmedia.com with a 300-500 word personal essay that shares why you write poetry. It can be serious, happy, sad, silly–whatever poetry means for you. And be sure to include your preferred bio (50-100 words) and head shot. If I like what you send, I’ll include it as a future guest post on the blog.

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Find more poetic posts here:

The post Why I Write Poetry: Annie Newcomer appeared first on WritersDigest.com.


from Writing Editor Blogs – WritersDigest.com http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/write-poetry-annie-newcomer

Monday, May 21, 2018

Grammar Check

This grammar exercise tests your understanding of basic grammar rules. Answer the following questions. Answers 1. Which of the following is the plural form of… Continue reading
from English Grammar https://www.englishgrammar.org/grammar-check/

Sunday, May 20, 2018

Such And So | Grammar Exercise

Fill in the blanks with such or so. Answers 1. She is such a lovely woman. 2. There was such a lot of commotion that… Continue reading
from English Grammar https://www.englishgrammar.org/such-and-so-grammar-exercise/

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Identify The Conditional

Identify the conditional verb form used in the following sentences. Answers 1. If you want to learn a musical instrument, you have to practice. (Zero… Continue reading
from English Grammar https://www.englishgrammar.org/identify-the-conditional/

Friday, May 18, 2018

Literary Agent Spotlight: Kristin Nelson of Nelson Literary Agency


Kristin Nelson is the President and Founding Literary Agent of Nelson Literary Agency, LLC, and she writes one of the most well-known and respected literary agent blogs around: PubRants. She has her B.A. from the University of Missouri at Columbia and is also a graduate of the University of Denver Publishing Institute. She has honed her skills for years, and as result she has become a highly successful literary agent.

She is looking for: literary and commercial fiction for adults; young adult and middle grade books for kids.

Here, Kristin tells us what she hopes to find in the slush pile. She offers tips for emerging writers and insights into her publishing journey.

How did you become an agent?

I became an agent by interning at several agencies and publishing houses through college. Once I graduated, I started looking for a position as an assistant at an agency, which is the best way to learn the job. From there, I apprenticed and began taking on clients and working my way up to being a full time agent.

Are you open for submissions? If so, help writers understand what kind of fiction and nonfiction projects you take queries for.

I am definitely open for submissions! I am looking for books that walk the line between commercial content and literary execution, particularly in young adult and middle grade fiction in all genres. I also represent select upmarket women’s fiction and the occasional adult SF/F project. I particularly enjoy complex female characters, queer narratives, quirky adventures, stories that ask readers to think deeply, girls with swords, and seaside novels. I also look for a strong narrative voice and characters I want to spend time with.

Do you have any tips for writers on opening and closing a novel well?

I like to think of the beginning of a novel as the question and the ending as the answer. The entire middle of a book is a conversation between the beginning and ending. As you edit, if you can identify the question the book is asking and the answer it is giving, you’re in great shape. The beginning should always have the end in mind.

Besides “good writing,” what are you looking for right now and not getting? What do you pray for when tackling the slush pile?

I want to be moved to tears. I want novels that are carefully crafted and engage with deep and nuanced thought. I also want stories with a sense of humor. I want projects I will be happy to read again and again. Novels that accomplish those things can be found in any genre—it is the quality of the craft, writing, characters, and story that make me say yes to a project.

What makes a manuscript stand out on a first read?

It all comes down to the writing and execution.

Do you have any tips for emerging authors on all things writing and publishing?

I think it is vital to know your market inside and out. Know the authors who are succeeding right now in your genre and figure out where your book fits in that conversation. Every book that is ever published is part of the greater literary conversation—learn your niche and figure out what your voice can contribute to moving that conversation forward.

What questions should an author ask an agent when they call to offer representation?

An author recently asked me if she could talk to one of my clients whose first book hadn’t sold and who I still hadn’t sold yet. I thought that was a really smart question because not every project sells and you want to know how an agent treats those clients just as much as you want to know how an agent treats the clients who are earning money.

And finally, any last piece of advice for writers seeking an agent?

Be professional! Learn as much about the industry as you can. Meet other writers. Find a critique group. Push yourself to improve your craft. Read lots of books in your genre. Make sure your manuscript is in the best shape possible before you begin the query process. You can read about my latest sales at Publishers Marketplace.

Submissions are accepted via email only.

  • In the subject line, write QUERY and the title of your project.
  • In the body of your email, include a one-page query letter and the first ten pages of your manuscript.
  • No attachments please. Emails with attachments are deleted unread due to virus concerns.

Submit a query directly to: querykristin@nelsonagency.com


Are you a literary agent who’s accepting queries? Get featured on the Guide to Literary Agents blog by contacting jessica.farris@fwmedia.com.


Online Course: Perfect Your Query Letter in 14 Days

The post Literary Agent Spotlight: Kristin Nelson of Nelson Literary Agency appeared first on WritersDigest.com.


from Writing Editor Blogs – WritersDigest.com http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/literary-fiction-agents/literary-agent-spotlight-kristin-nelson-of-nelson-literary-agency

Thursday, May 17, 2018

Adjectives Ending In -Ic and -Ical

Fill in the blanks. Answers 1. She wants to learn classical music. 2. It is a classic movie. 3. Inflation can affect the economic stability… Continue reading
from English Grammar https://www.englishgrammar.org/adjectives-ending-in-ic-and-ical/

30 Poetry Prompts for the 2018 April PAD Challenge

Find all 30 poetry prompts for the 2018 April Poem-A-Day Challenge below. I will link each day back to the original post with a super concise prompt. Just click the link if you need more guidance or ideas on how to come at the prompt.

Happy poeming!

*****

Master Poetic Forms!

Learn how to write sestina, shadorma, haiku, monotetra, golden shovel, and more with The Writer’s Digest Guide to Poetic Forms, by Robert Lee Brewer.

This e-book covers more than 40 poetic forms and shares examples to illustrate how each form works.

Discover a new universe of poetic possibilities and apply it to your poetry today!

Click to continue.

*****

30 Poetry Prompts for the 2018 April PAD Challenge!

Day 1: Secret Poem
Day 2: Portrait Poem
Day 3: Stop and/or Don’t Stop Poem
Day 4: “Case (blank)” Poem
Day 5: Intelligence Poem

Day 6: Food Title Poem
Day 7: Senses Poem
Day 8: Family Poem
Day 9: “Battle (blank)” Poem
Day 10: Deal and/or No Deal Poem

Day 11: Warning Poem
Day 12: Lament Poem
Day 13: Insect Title Poem
Day 14: Report Poem
Day 15: Metaphor Poem

Day 16: Favorite Poem
Day 17: Love and/or Anti-Love Poem
Day 18: Temptation Poem
Day 19: “(blank) Thread” Poem
Day 20: Earlier Line Poem

Day 21: Danger Poem
Day 22: Plant Title Poem
Day 23: Action Poem
Day 24: Roundelay and/or Anti-Form Poem
Day 25: Word Title Poem

Day 26: Relationship Poem
Day 27: Story Poem
Day 28: “(blank) Wave” Poem
Day 29: Response Poem
Day 30: Closing Time Poem

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Robert Lee Brewer

Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He edits Poet’s Market and Writer’s Market, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and a poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

He just completed his 11th April Poem-A-Day Chapbook Challenge and 21st poem-a-day challenge (he hosts one in November too). Join him for his 22nd such challenge on November 1, 2018.

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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Find more poetic goodies here:

The post 30 Poetry Prompts for the 2018 April PAD Challenge appeared first on WritersDigest.com.


from Writing Editor Blogs – WritersDigest.com http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/30-poetry-prompts-2018-april-pad-challenge